« June 2005 | Main | August 2005 »

July 31, 2005

The Canadians show B100 is great in boats!

BioMer - Biodiesel - Projet - Qu�bec - Montr�al. Their conclusion? Use it you hoser! eh!


Posted by Martin at 10:11 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

July 28, 2005

Oregon Biodiesel legislation moves to conference committee this week!

The biofuels bill (HB 3481) now heads to a conference committee, which may decide the fate of the bill this week. As you know, the Oregon House and Oregon Senate passed distinctly different versions of HB 3481.  The conference committee’s charge is to develop a compromise bill that both the House and Senate can agree on. 

 

OEC believes that several pieces of the bill are on firm footing, including the property tax exemption for production facilities, the tax credits for growers and producers, the ban on MTBE, the expedited energy facility siting, and the reduction in the fuel tax on biodiesel.

 

Less certain is the outcome of the Renewable Fuel Standard, funding for the Clean School Bus Grant Fund, the mandate that state government use biodiesel, and the controversial expansion of the Pollution Control Tax Credit.

 

We encourage you to contact the conference committee members to make one final plug for the biofuels legislation!  Please do so within the next 48 hours.

 

CONFERENCE COMMITTEE MEMBERS

 

Senator Ryan Deckert, 503-986-1714, sen.ryandeckert@state.or.us

Senator Frank Shields, 503-986-1724, sen.frankshields@state.or.us

Senator Ben Westlund, 503-986-1727, sen.benwestlund@state.or.us

Representative Gordon Anderson, 503-986-1403, rep.gordonanderson@state.or.us

Representative Brian Boquist, 503-986-1423, rep.brianboquist@state.or.us

Representative Mike Schaufler, 503-986-1448, rep.mikeschaufler@state.or.us

 

Below is an explanation of OEC’s position on the key pieces of the bill that are still uncertain.

 

Chris Hagerbaumer
Oregon Environmental Council

503-222-1963 x102

 

WHY OEC SUPPORTS A RENEWABLE FUEL STANDARD

 

The Renewable Fuel Standard would require oil companies to blend 10% ethanol into gasoline by 2010 and 2% biodiesel into diesel by mid-2006, rising to 5% biodiesel by 2010.  It is tied to in-state production –- the requirement would not go into effect unless a portion of the renewable fuel were produced in Oregon.

 

By requiring a minimum blend of renewable fuel in gasoline and diesel sold in the state, the Renewable Fuel Standard would reduce our dependence on petroleum and save consumers money at the pump.  A recent Consumer Federation of America publication reports that major oil companies cost drivers as much as 8 cents a gallon by not blending lower-cost ethanol.  The Renewable Fuel Standard also ensures a steady market for biofuels producers interested in locating in Oregon

 

A Renewable Fuel Standard requires oil companies to do their part to clean up our air and move toward a renewable fuel future.  Oil companies resist substituting biofuels for petroleum fuels because doing so allows them to limit competition and keep petroleum fuel prices high. A Renewable Fuel Standard would create a freer and more competitive market, resulting in lower prices for consumers.

 

A Renewable Fuel Standard is very timely.  The oxygenated fuel requirement for gasoline in the Portland metro area will be dropped after 2007. We therefore need a statewide requirement.  In addition, the 2% biodiesel blend could act as a necessary lubricant for ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD).  By federal mandate, ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel will replace conventional on-road diesel nationwide beginning June 2006. ULSD will require the addition of a “lubricity agent.” By instating a Renewable Fuel Standard, the Legislature would ensure that Oregon’s fuel distributors will mix a nontoxic, renewable lubricity agent produced in Oregon instead of a chemically-derived lubricity agent produced elsewhere.

 

WHY OEC SUPPORTS FUNDING FOR THE CLEAN SCHOOL BUS GRANT FUND

 

Recent studies indicate serious health risks to children from exposure to diesel school bus exhaust.  The Clean School Bus Grant Fund will help school districts replace their oldest, dirtiest school buses, install pollution control devices, and purchase biodiesel.  There are federal funds for school bus clean up, but the Clean School Bus USA grant program requires a 5% cost share.  States that can provide or exceed this match requirement are much more competitive. Our children deserve cleaner air.

 

WHY OEC SUPPORTS A REQUIREMENT THAT STATE GOVERNMENT USE BIODIESEL

 

The original legislation included a requirement that state government displace with biodiesel at least 5% of the total amount of diesel it consumes in on- and off-road diesel engines.  This builds the market for biodiesel, requiring the state to lead by example in a very flexible way. 

 

WHY OEC DOES NOT SUPPORT EXPANSION OF THE POLLUTION CONTROL TAX CREDIT

 

Associated Oregon Industries persuaded lawmakers to insert language into the House version of HB 3481 that would expand and extend the state's pollution-control tax credit (PCTC) from its 2008 termination date to 2016.  This rolls back a compromise that was made in 2003.  The PCTC was created in 1967 to help industries put new pollution controls into place. Now the tax credit is nothing more than a subsidy which pays polluters to obey clean air and water laws that have been on the books for years.  In addition, the tax credit is very expensive – the state estimates that the PCTC will cost $24.8 million in the 2005-07 budget. In these tight budget times, there are much more effective ways to protect Oregon’s environment and support Oregon businesses.   

 

 

 

 


Posted by Martin at 9:46 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

July 20, 2005

more grist for the biofuels energy balance mill

Here is a European analysis: SenterNovem GAVE, Climate neutral gaseous and liquid fuels / biofuels. NOT funded by the oil industry. It focuses on breaking out the non-renewable energy used to create renewable energy and it is about 1/3 of the energy (pesticides, fertilisers and chemicals). When you consider the energy effeciency of biofuels in their use of non-renewable energy they are VERY effecient!

Posted by Martin at 12:26 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

July 19, 2005

One man's response to the poor science of Pimentel/Patzek

Dear Editor,

I was disappointed to read your article "Study: Biofuels a net drain on energy" (Monday, A4). The study you cited has been roundly dismissed in the scientific community. In fact, every other legitimate peer-reviewed study shows a positive energy balance for biodiesel. A comprehensive study published by the Dept of Energy and the USDA found 3.2 energy units gained for every energy unit used in production of biodiesel. This number is the accepted norm. Biodiesel production and use holds tremendous potential benefits for Washington state businesses and citizens. Publishing your article without proper editorial review does a disservice to your readers, who deserve unbiased facts about biodiesel, a rapidly emerging solution to our oil dependence and polluted air.

The study author's motives are suspect. As Joe Jobe, of the National Biodiesel Board, notes "The biodiesel energy balance paper by David Pimentel, an entomologist at Cornell, and Tad Patzek, director of the University of California Oil Consortium, is poor science and misleading.
The study concluded that biodiesel has a negative energy balance, which contradicts the wide body of sound scientific studies. Pimentel and Patzek appear to go so far out of their way to support their case that it borders on the absurd. For example, the study counts calories consumed by farmers as energy inputs for biodiesel, yet it does not give biodiesel credit for the value of glycerin produced as a co-product. While soybeans are approximately 80% protein meal and 20% oil, the study allocates 79% of the energy inputs for growing soybeans to the oil."

Washington farmers and biodiesel innovators have been dealt a set-back by The Times' lazy attitude picking up a poorly research filler article from the AP wire. Important issues including national security, health of our citizens, and economic growth are dependent upon a future of alternative fuels. Please do better next time.

Posted by Martin at 1:22 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Good discecting of the flawed Pimentel study

GrimReader: Actually *reading* the article better than reporting on the reporting of the article ... by the author!

Posted by Martin at 1:02 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

What is the REAL energy balance of Biodiesel?

There have been a number of news studies recently quoting bad science with claims that it takes more energy to make biofuels than petroleum fuels. Independent third-party, peer-reviewed studies show biodiesel has the highest energy balance of ANY fuel. A prominent USDA/DOE study shows for every unit of fossil fuel used to make biodiesel, 3.2 units of energy are gained in energy output. That's a 320% increase and includes soybean planting, harvesting, fuel production and transportation. I trust the USDA/DOE more than tenured professors who have been crying wolf for 20 years.DOE energy balance study.pdf

Posted by Martin at 10:13 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

July 18, 2005

First biodiesel pump goes in Vancouver BC

Hey guys, welcome to the party...Today's Trucking: News

Posted by Martin at 10:33 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Kyoto is good for biodiesel

In Seattle we are lucky to have Mayor Nickels. As I have posted about before, he is a leader in getting cities to adopt Kyoto protocols. See recent story: The Stranger - News - City - Political Climate Change where he credits biodiesel as a major factor in helping Seattle meet it's Kyoto goals. Biodiesel and Kyoto, the two go well together.

Posted by Martin at 10:31 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

More B100 Trials in Himalays

And people say there are warranty issues? Green Car Congress: DaimlerChrysler Extends B100 Trials to Himalayas. There are none. DaimlerCHrysler is just trying to build up enough data to protect themselves. You see no fuel is warranteed. If they expressly warantee B100 they are ADDING liability which they do not now have with regular dino diesel. So they need studies. Keep going with the studies guys!

Posted by Martin at 8:52 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Seattle Biodiesel in the news again

The Seattle Times: Business & Technology: The future of fuel: It smells like popcorn

Posted by Martin at 11:46 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

July 12, 2005

First (small) biodiesel plant in Oregon




















State's first biodiesel plant opens in
Salem


Facility will make 1 million gallons of fuel per
year, enough to satisfy area needs



July 8, 2005


Oregon's first biodiesel-production plant opened
Thursday at an industrial site in southeast Salem.


Salem Mayor Janet Taylor pushed a button at the grand
opening, and a low hum emanated from a large steel tank. A private
company developed the nondescript plant at 4725 Turner Road SE. The
biodiesel plant will employ two operators and its capacity is small
by industry standards, but many people hope it's the start of a new
era of home-grown energy.


"This is a big day for Oregon," said Gov. Ted
Kulongoski, who spoke at the plant's opening.


Kulongoski and others have pushed legislation to
promote alternative fuels in Oregon, including expanding the use of
biodiesel. The fuel is a blend of diesel and vegetable oil, that can
power diesel engines. It burns cleaner than petroleum diesel alone
and results in lower emissions and improved air quality.


The vegetable oil for biodiesel often is extracted
from oil-seed crops, such as canola. Used cooking oil from food
processors and restaurants also is used for biodiesel.


The plant, operated by Oregon-based SeQuential
Biofuels and Hawaii-based Pacific Biodiesel Inc., will begin
production using used cooking oil for raw materials.


Salem-based Kettle Foods, a maker of kettle-cooked
potato chips, will supply a portion of the used cooking oil for
biodiesel production. Cameron Healy, a founder of Kettle Foods, is a
minority investor in the biodiesel plant.


The Salem plant will produce 1 million gallons of
biodiesel fuel per year -- enough to supply all of the biodiesel
market in Oregon. In comparison, some biodiesel plants in the
Midwest produce as much as 30 million gallons of biodiesel per
year.


The project's backers expect that the demand for
biodiesel in Oregon will grow exponentially.


"We anticipate that we're going to push the market a
lot harder and create demand for more than 1 million gallons of
biodiesel," said Tomas Endicott, a partner with SeQuential
Biofuels.


Government fleets, such as those owned by the state,
are among the largest users of biodiesel fuel, he said.


The joint venture also intends to build a plant in
Portland that would produce as much as 4 million gallons of
biodiesel annually. It originally had planned to start biodiesel
production in Portland but later revised its plans when getting
permits approved took longer than expected.


Starting production at an existing industrial site in
Salem allowed the joint venture to get its diesel on the market
about six months sooner, Endicott said. When the Portland plant is
operational, the joint venture will decide whether the equipment in
Salem will stay or be relocated to Portland.


"We think there is such a good market that we couldn't
build plants fast enough," said John Miller, a Salem businessman who
also is a minority investor in the project. Miller said he's
optimistic that the Salem plant will remain open for the long
term.


Backers of the project say Oregon can't rely on used
cooking oil alone to sustain biodiesel production. Eventually, the
state will need to start growing oil-seed crops to supply vegetable
oil.


Growing crops for biofuels could become another source
of income for Oregon farmers. But growing canola seed in the
Willamette Valley is problematic. Canola can cross-pollinate with
vegetable-seed crops, contaminating the vegetable-seed-grower's
crop. Vegetable-seed growers are demanding restrictions on canola
production.


Country-western singer Willie Nelson also is among the
minority investors in the Salem biodiesel plant.


In a videotaped presentation, Nelson greeted Oregon's
governor and Salem's mayor. A hat that was autographed by Nelson was
presented to the governor.


href="mailto:mrose@StatesmanJournal.com">mrose@StatesmanJournal.com
or (503)399-6657


src="http://www.statesmanjournal.com/graphics/invisible1.gif"
width=8 border=0>
src="http://www.statesmanjournal.com/graphics/invisible1.gif"
width=1 border=0>
src="http://www.statesmanjournal.com/graphics/invisible1.gif"
width=5 border=0>

 



src="http://www.statesmanjournal.com/graphics/invisible1.gif"
width=200 border=0>
src="http://www.statesmanjournal.com/graphics/invisible1.gif" width=8
border=0>




src="http://news.statesmanjournal.com/graphics/invisible1.gif" width=1
border=0>


Kathy
Hyzy
Program
Assistant
Oregon Environmental
Council
222 NW Davis St Ste
309
503-222-1963 x
105
href="http://www.oeconline.org">http://www.oeconline.org
style="FONT-FAMILY: Georgia"> href="http://www.biofuels4oregon.org">http://www.biofuels4oregon.org


style="FONT-FAMILY: Georgia"> "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /> 


 

Posted by Martin at 12:09 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

First (small) biodiesel plant in Oregon




















State's first biodiesel plant opens in
Salem


Facility will make 1 million gallons of fuel per
year, enough to satisfy area needs



July 8, 2005


Oregon's first biodiesel-production plant opened
Thursday at an industrial site in southeast Salem.


Salem Mayor Janet Taylor pushed a button at the grand
opening, and a low hum emanated from a large steel tank. A private
company developed the nondescript plant at 4725 Turner Road SE. The
biodiesel plant will employ two operators and its capacity is small
by industry standards, but many people hope it's the start of a new
era of home-grown energy.


"This is a big day for Oregon," said Gov. Ted
Kulongoski, who spoke at the plant's opening.


Kulongoski and others have pushed legislation to
promote alternative fuels in Oregon, including expanding the use of
biodiesel. The fuel is a blend of diesel and vegetable oil, that can
power diesel engines. It burns cleaner than petroleum diesel alone
and results in lower emissions and improved air quality.


The vegetable oil for biodiesel often is extracted
from oil-seed crops, such as canola. Used cooking oil from food
processors and restaurants also is used for biodiesel.


The plant, operated by Oregon-based SeQuential
Biofuels and Hawaii-based Pacific Biodiesel Inc., will begin
production using used cooking oil for raw materials.


Salem-based Kettle Foods, a maker of kettle-cooked
potato chips, will supply a portion of the used cooking oil for
biodiesel production. Cameron Healy, a founder of Kettle Foods, is a
minority investor in the biodiesel plant.


The Salem plant will produce 1 million gallons of
biodiesel fuel per year -- enough to supply all of the biodiesel
market in Oregon. In comparison, some biodiesel plants in the
Midwest produce as much as 30 million gallons of biodiesel per
year.


The project's backers expect that the demand for
biodiesel in Oregon will grow exponentially.


"We anticipate that we're going to push the market a
lot harder and create demand for more than 1 million gallons of
biodiesel," said Tomas Endicott, a partner with SeQuential
Biofuels.


Government fleets, such as those owned by the state,
are among the largest users of biodiesel fuel, he said.


The joint venture also intends to build a plant in
Portland that would produce as much as 4 million gallons of
biodiesel annually. It originally had planned to start biodiesel
production in Portland but later revised its plans when getting
permits approved took longer than expected.


Starting production at an existing industrial site in
Salem allowed the joint venture to get its diesel on the market
about six months sooner, Endicott said. When the Portland plant is
operational, the joint venture will decide whether the equipment in
Salem will stay or be relocated to Portland.


"We think there is such a good market that we couldn't
build plants fast enough," said John Miller, a Salem businessman who
also is a minority investor in the project. Miller said he's
optimistic that the Salem plant will remain open for the long
term.


Backers of the project say Oregon can't rely on used
cooking oil alone to sustain biodiesel production. Eventually, the
state will need to start growing oil-seed crops to supply vegetable
oil.


Growing crops for biofuels could become another source
of income for Oregon farmers. But growing canola seed in the
Willamette Valley is problematic. Canola can cross-pollinate with
vegetable-seed crops, contaminating the vegetable-seed-grower's
crop. Vegetable-seed growers are demanding restrictions on canola
production.


Country-western singer Willie Nelson also is among the
minority investors in the Salem biodiesel plant.


In a videotaped presentation, Nelson greeted Oregon's
governor and Salem's mayor. A hat that was autographed by Nelson was
presented to the governor.


href="mailto:mrose@StatesmanJournal.com">mrose@StatesmanJournal.com
or (503)399-6657


src="http://www.statesmanjournal.com/graphics/invisible1.gif"
width=8 border=0>
src="http://www.statesmanjournal.com/graphics/invisible1.gif"
width=1 border=0>
src="http://www.statesmanjournal.com/graphics/invisible1.gif"
width=5 border=0>

 



src="http://www.statesmanjournal.com/graphics/invisible1.gif"
width=200 border=0>
src="http://www.statesmanjournal.com/graphics/invisible1.gif" width=8
border=0>




src="http://news.statesmanjournal.com/graphics/invisible1.gif" width=1
border=0>


Kathy
Hyzy
Program
Assistant
Oregon Environmental
Council
222 NW Davis St Ste
309
503-222-1963 x
105
href="http://www.oeconline.org">http://www.oeconline.org
style="FONT-FAMILY: Georgia"> href="http://www.biofuels4oregon.org">http://www.biofuels4oregon.org


style="FONT-FAMILY: Georgia"> "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /> 


 

Posted by Martin at 12:00 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

July 7, 2005

Defending Biofuels

Recently there have been a number of press reports negative on biofuels. Most are related to a Cornell-Berkely study by David Pimentel and Tad Patzek primarilly focusing on the total energy required to produce a unit of biomass based energy (primarilly ethanol). While I just received a copy of the study and haven't read it yet, a number of bloggers are already responding to it. Check here: sustainablog: Defending Biofuels for good links to how to respond to this criticism.

Posted by Martin at 10:59 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

July 2, 2005

wow, another study showing growth in diesel light truck sales

let's hope Ricardo knows what they are talking about. Green Car Congress: Ricardo Predicts Rapid Expansion in US Light-Duty Diesel Market. Growth from 43,000 units to 1.5M in 2015. How many would you guess are going to be running biodiesel?

Posted by Martin at 11:37 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

J.D. Powers forecast 150% growth in Diesel auto sales

by 2012. Would be nice. Green Car Congress: J.D. Power Forecasts Hybrids and Diesels to be 11% of Sales in 2012

Posted by Martin at 11:27 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Biodiesel has VERY high life cycle energy effeciency

I have seen this before, but now have the source. Biodiesel has a very favorable Energy Yield; that is, the amount of energy gained versus the amount of energy required to produce a gallon of biodiesel. This is one reason that interest in biodiesel has been so strong.

* USDA/DOE Study - “Lifecycle Inventory of Biodiesel and Petroleum Diesel for Use in an Urban Bus.”, May 98, Institute for Local Self Reliance, 8/95.

Posted by Martin at 9:09 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Come to the Oil Independence Parade in Seattle tomorrow!

Independence From Oil Day - July 3rd, 2005

Posted by Martin at 8:03 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack